• Assess Your Own Mentoring Skills
    Posted in Mentoring Tips on March 28, 2014

    Assess your own mentoring skills. Think about previous individuals who guided you along your path, and try to remember what worked, and what didn’t. Figure out what you know about mentoring, and what you still need to work on. 

  • Effective Mentoring
    Posted in General on March 28, 2014

    While the act of mentoring has a long-standing reputation for helping and nurturing the growth of individuals, it is inevitable that some mentors will be more effective than others. Moreover, although effective mentoring characteristics are generally based on the needs of the mentor or mentee, there exists some good "universal" mentoring characteristics, which are applicable in almost all situations.  

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  • Be Reliable!
    Posted in Mentoring Tips on March 31, 2014

    Communicate frequently and keep your mentor or mentee up to date with important events. Inform your mentoring partner of any important changes that could impact the relationship.

  • Holistic Developmental Relationships for Successful Minority Scholars
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on March 25, 2014

    Developmental relationships are essential to the healthy transition of all individuals. This is especially true as students transition from high school, to and through college, and as they move on to their professional life beyond college. At Indiana University, we have over 800 high-achieving underrepresented students who make up the Hudson and Holland Scholars Program (HHSP) and have found success in providing a variety of programs and services to assist these transitioning students utilizing a holistic framework based on student success. The Holistic Philosophy of Scholar Success (HoPSS) program is built as part of a partnership with the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington. It engages students individually and in groups through a variety of educational programs based on the six dimensions of wellness. Proposed by Hettler (1976), these six include the: physical, emotional, intellectual, social, occupational and spiritual dimensions. The program acknowledges the scholar as a whole person with dynamic relationships who possesses the characteristics of successful students (Downing, 2011) and delivers programs utilizing a public health lens. This paper provides specific components of the HoPSS model, evaluation tools and results. The hope is to share our model, allow for discussion at the Mentoring Conference 2013, and initiate ongoing conversation about how to support relationship development among high achieving underrepresented students.

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  • How Mentoring Rescues and Restores Resilient Learners
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on March 25, 2014

    The presentation will focus on rescuing and restoring resilient learners in K-12 education with the primary focus being on K-5 early intervention. Among the areas discussed will be how mentoring assists students to overcome negative socio-economic factors and other distractions as long as the mentoring environment allows them to feel cared about, supported, and that their needs are being met. Research will be shared that demonstrates how effective structured mentoring and positive support can lead to positive interactions conducive to learning. The focus of this research is based on a mentoring strategy called Mentoring-Success and will demonstrate to participants how the concepts can be used in their own mentoring efforts.

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  • Your Turn, My Turn, Our Turn--How to Decide: Developing Co-Teaching Relationships
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on March 25, 2014

    Modeling a co-teaching relationship in a teacher education master’s level STEM program, two faculty members co-taught two semester courses to a cohort of teacher candidates in a one-year, field-intensive teacher preparation program. The two university classes were co-taught by a general and special education faculty member.  Managing and Monitoring Student Learning: Designed to help general education teacher candidates (grades 7-12) become more proficient at managing classroom procedures and student behavior. In addition this class will give teacher candidates the skills needed to use classroom assessment data more efficiently and effectively through analysis and application, promoting data-driven decision making and problem solving.  Differentiated Instructional Adaptations: Designed to develop skills needed by licensed general education teachers to work with learners with exceptionalities and diverse needs in inclusive classrooms. Content includes collaboration strategies, curriculum modifications, instruction and management adaptations, principles and skills for differentiating instruction in an inclusive classroom.  Pre-, post-, and delayed-post surveys tracked the development of candidates’ understandings of co-teaching and the developmental relationships central to co-teaching. Candidates were required to co-teach two lessons with their cooperating teachers using a co-teaching model (one teach, one assist was not an option) and reflect on the experience. Finally, candidates completed weekly online reflections based on observations of co-teaching in the university classroom and co-teaching experiences in their grade 7-12 classrooms. Data from reflections and surveys reveal challenges and progress made in navigating and establishing developmental relationships with their cooperating teachers in the areas of co-planning, co-assessing, classroom management, contrasting teaching styles, and expectations.

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  • The Words Remain Inside Project: Bulling Stops Here!
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on March 25, 2014

    The Words Remain Inside: Bullying Stops Here! will address critical and recent tragic incidents that have occurred between students and teachers or among children within a classroom setting and beyond. The presentation will educate teachers on how to distinguish what is teasing and bullying and knowing the signs that could prevent further untimely deaths. The presentation will have concept-based learning approaches coupled with project based learning. Each participant will create a puppet that will concretely represent what words can do: hurt, cause conflict and unfortunately marinate inside. Hence, this project- based learning can easily be replicated in each teacher’s classroom and address different kind of conflicts in the classroom, school, or home. According to Smith, Cowie and Blades (2011); “Conflict can be unpleasant in short term and if repeated patterns of pervasive behavior, may be detrimental” (p. 164). Some critical incidents that are encountered between children in the classrooms or school could be avoided or thwarted if the proper professional development is implemented and educators become aware of what detriment persistent taunting does. Educators should make it their aim to redirect student’s anteceding triggers or taunts before the students become despondent and withdrawn. 

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  • Self-Management Applications for Facilitating Developmental Relationships
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on March 25, 2014

    A cognitive behavior analysis approach to facilitating success in the areas of social skills acquisition and improvement on academic tasks is described.  Specifically a model of consciousness was developed to facilitate self-management of behavior. The NZC (Neutral Zone of Consciousness) will be contrasted with the AZC (Analysis Zone of Consciousness) for purposes of facilitating developmental relationships via teaching the appropriateness of control and surrender in consciousness.  Stand Back Awareness (SBA) as applied in self-management projects based on an applied cognitive behavior analysis methodology is used to illustrate the nature of the NZC.  The content-focused Analysis Zone of Consciousness (AZC) is examined in detail from an applied behavior analysis perspective.  A methodological framework of operational definitions, target behaviors, functional analysis, and metacognitive analysis of attention, thinking, and beliefs are exemplified as correlates of the AZC and are contrasted with the correlates of the NZC.  Likewise, examples of activities correlated with the observer-focused NZC are examined including: mediation, meditation, the fake-it-till-you-make-it technique and the Quaker concept of transforming power as applied in violence reduction/prevention role plays and other experiential activities.  NZC correlates of mystical experience are also examined with emphasis on the reciprocal roles of practical metaphysical activities and mystical insight (inspiration and motivation). Stand Back Awareness (SBA) is illustrated as applying both the content-focused AZC and observer-focused NZC facilitating decreases in nonproductive anxiety and anger and increases in attending and concentration behaviors, memory, and academic tasks.  General suggestions for facilitating the acquisition of self-management tools in developmental relationships will be summarized.

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  • The Mentoring Trifecta: Coursework, Events & Networking
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on March 25, 2014

    The advertising program at the Boston University College of Communication is a professionally oriented major with advertising classes in account management, creative development, digital media and consumer insight. Despite the recession, graduates of the program have succeeded in entering the job market at advertising, social media and digital agencies. This is a direct result of strong mentoring, networking and the building of long lasting relationships between the faculty and alumni. The model for success is combining coursework, networking and events to facilitate securing of entry-level jobs for new graduates. AdLab is the student operated ad agency at Boston University. It is a real agency servicing 25 clients each semester. A student Executive Board leads the other students registered in the course who work as account teams at the agency. The experience in AdLab, combined with internships, prepares students for careers in advertising.  Every year 12 students are selected to visit New York advertising agencies and meet Boston University alumni. Many of the alumni served on the AdLab EBoard and went on the NY trip. This reinforces the connection between current and past students in the ad program. The college also sponsors Adstravaganza, a large event attended by the ad faculty held every spring in NY for the alumni. Mentoring relationships are reinforced on a regular basis.The connection between AdLab and the NY events creates a strong bond linking alumni, students and faculty. This generates ongoing relationships benefiting students in the advertising program and opening the way for entry-level jobs.

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  • Developing a Faculty Mentoring Program: A Pilot Project
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on March 25, 2014

    Inspired by their attendance at the 2012 Mentoring Institute, three faculty from different health and human service disciplines are working together to create a formalized mentoring program for their university.  Funding is being provided by the Provost and the College to develop a pilot program across seven academic departments in one College during the 2013-2014 academic year. Best practices identified during a literature review and visits to other universities with established mentoring programs will provide the framework for the pilot program. Newly hired tenure track faculty and their assigned mentors will be provided with resources and have regularly scheduled meetings to assist new faculty in adjusting to the university and assist the mentors in providing effective guidance. Using a mixed methods design, data will be collected throughout the year to assess program effectiveness. Both graduate and undergraduate students will be included to assist with literature review, tool development, data collection, and data analysis. This presentation will discuss the inspiration for the program, its structure, methodology, funding, and resources. Baseline data, collected from 2012-2013 new hires not involved in a formal mentoring program, will be discussed as well as preliminary data collected from the newly hired faculty and their mentors.

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