• Mentoring Teacher Candidates: The Co-Teaching Model
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 17, 2015

    Previous research shows that co-teaching during the student teaching practicum should be the model used by colleges and universities.  This researcher used an open-ended questionnaire, a Likert-type scale survey, and individual conferences to ascertain teacher candidates’, cooperating teachers’, and university supervisors’ perceptions of the co-teaching model’s benefits, or lack thereof.  The twelve student teachers surveyed represent a small private university in the Northeast and earned degrees in early childhood education, elementary education, and special education.  The teacher candidates’ cooperating teachers and university supervisors are hired by the university and are experts in the three afore mentioned fields of education. Findings reveal that pre-teacher candidates, university supervisors, and cooperating teachers all believe that mentoring during student teaching using the co-teaching model is beneficial for both the pre-teacher candidates and students in the classroom if proper professional development is offered and continuous and on-going reflection and planning takes place. 

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  • Shifting Paradigms about Student Mentoring
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    Executive recruiting firm Korn/Ferry International (Dishman, 2012) indicates that mentoring is the second most important factor after education in determining a person’s professional success, yet due to resources and dynamics, the number of students who participate in a mentoring experience in college is very limited. Traditionally, university mentoring is offered to earmarked groups of students such as graduate students or special populations.  Is there a scalable and effective way to expand the scope of participation while maintaining and improving the quality of the mentoring relationship in the higher education environment?  Utah Valley University, known for its engaged learning environment, has developed such a program and is currently piloting the process through its CareerPassport Mentoring Program (CPM). CareerPassport Mentoring Program Elements:  Utah Valley University has provided limited mentoring opportunities on campus for several years through a peer-to-peer program and a few small departmental efforts. The CareerPassport Mentoring Program (CPM), a new mentoring offering, was created in 2013 by Sherry Harward, Director of the Institute for Professional Engagement, as a component of the CareerPassport Program which provides students a structured and engaged process to participate in career exploration, selection and preparation. The goal of the mentoring program is to expand the opportunity to all students on campus to participate in the mentoring experience during their entire college experience at UVU. The following paragraph describes the mentoring philosophy of the CPM Program.

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  • Mentors’ Perceptions of Stressful Mentoring Relationships: A Preliminary Report on Scale Development
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    In an increasingly globalized and dynamic work environment, implementation of effective mentoring programs is critical in attracting, developing, and engaging talent.  Organizational mentoring programs which are structured to protect mentors from stressful experiences may play significant roles in outcomes of mentoring effectiveness.  However, for too long, a rather one-sided focus on the protégé perspective may have limited our understanding of the full spectrum of experiences in mentoring relationships.  In the current study, interviews (N=24) were conducted to develop a theoretically sound multidimensional measure of stressors for mentors (SMQ; Stressors for Mentors Questionnaire).  Based on these interviews, items were developed and five preliminary dimensions (stressful protégé behaviors, poor dyadic fit, mentor’s personal issues, structural constraints, and lack of organizational support) were established.  Our findings are significant for integrating the mentors’ perspective with the current state of research on negative experiences in mentoring relationships.  Further, current findings have relevance within the broader context of cross-cultural mentoring relationships given the pervasiveness of “cultural gap” being mentioned as a stressor by mentors during our interviews. 

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  • Generational Mentoring for Success
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    This paper discusses the importance of organizational knowledge and how generational characteristics can impede or foster effective job mentoring efforts. Today, there are often multiple generations within the organization’s workforce and, through an appreciation of these age based differences, mentoring programs can be developed that lead to complementary development for all parties in that relationship. The losses of job know how as older workers exit the organization becomes a critical talent management issue. The author discusses certain generational opportunities for matching individuals which could prove effective in a variety of organizations, most particularly in the manufacturing and technological sectors. The paper concludes with a number of practical suggestions for organizations that pursue developmental relationships structured to preserve knowledge within its human capital. 

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  • PING! Mentor Model for Bringing Music Opportunities to Low-income Students
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    PING! (Providing Instruments for the Next Generation) loans musical instruments and provides music enrichment to over 160 low-income 4th – 12th grade students each year in Oak Park and River Forest, Illinois so they can experience the instrumental music programs in the community’s public schools. The PING! Mentor Program serves about 40 6th – 8th grade PING! students each year and – in addition to loaning them an instrument - provides music instruction, friendship and a transition path to high school by pairing them with high school student musicians for bi-weekly, hour-long music lessons throughout the school year.  In their bi-weekly sessions the mentors work with the middle school students on music lessons and rhythm exercises. Throughout the year they also engage the middle school students in activities at the high school, such as attending concerts.  The program benefits both mentors and their mentees.  The high school mentors collectively contribute over 900 hours annually, building skills, inspiring confidence, giving friendship and providing positive role models for their younger peers. Being a PING! high school mentor is a coveted role, and mentors not only enjoy their service, but feel they grow as musicians and leaders. Middle school teachers report that many of their PING! students are more engaged at school.  The number of  PING! students continuing with music into high school has quintupled in the last seven years and each year several PING! high school students become mentors themselves.  This paper shares the steps and best practices to replicate this mentoring model. 

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  • Mentoring Members in a Professional Association for Leadership Roles
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    Smaller professional groups have a continual struggle of providing quality leadership within their associations. The Christian Society of Kinesiology and Leisure Studies (CSKLS) is beginning to address this issue. A committee within the association has developed a plan of action and is in the process of implementing the initial stages. The goal is to encourage members to pursue leadership roles within the association. Once these individuals have been identified and show interest in leadership, current and past leaders will begin mentoring efforts to maintain this interest. It is projected that this effort will help retain members and provide quality leadership for the future. Activities and strategies for this mentoring process will be presented and an open discussion will be encouraged to address additional ideas and suggestions. Guidelines for the process will be provided. Professional mentoring is one way to provide an apprenticeship experience for future leaders in the professional ranks.

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  • Collaborative Partnerships: Pre-Service Teachers and Professional Practice
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    This paper will focus on the way in which pre-service teachers in a newly organized Bachelor of Education program collaborate in order to support their own learning in a four-week field experience placement. Pre-service teachers are placed in pairs in a classroom setting together with a professional teacher who guides and mentors their emerging pedagogical practice. The emphasis for the placement is on a growing ability to act thoughtfully in the classroom and within the school community, and on acquiring a deeper understanding of learners and of the enactment of curriculum and pedagogical relationships within a whole class context. This innovative pairing of pre-service teachers in the field reflects the core philosophical framework for the new teacher education program at the University of Calgary. While the classroom teacher is an integral partner in the development of professional dispositions and pedagogical knowledge in pre-service teachers, this paper takes up the ways in which the pre-service teachers support and challenge each other while moving towards individual competencies. The Learning Partnership Model (Baxter Magolda, 2004, 2009, 2010) provides the framework for this examination of student learning and development. This model and the three principles that inform it, suggest a way to understand the engagement of pre-service teachers with their teaching practice, their professional identity and the resulting shift as they begin to create and author their beliefs and values. 

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  • Ideas from One Campus that Work for Successful Developmental Relationships
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    Institutions of higher learning require that faculty and other specified staff engage in community service or outreach activities.  We wanted to identify the varied ways that this was being accomplished and determine how the activities provided a crosswalk to creating effective developmental relationships that support the sustainability of the university in the local community.  If university faculty and staff engaged in outreach activities with the identified groups, it was important to know that offers from the university to provide services to the groups would be accepted and viewed in a favorable manner, or, that the groups listed would interact in ways that benefited the university.  The author compiled a listing of the following groups that were included in the community service and outreach efforts:  other higher education institutions, school districts, schools, businesses, and community organizations.  The research was conducted with collaboration among one faculty member, one adjunct instructor, and one staff member from the university, two administrators from two local school districts, and a member of the local Rotary Club. This was coupled with evaluating quantitative data from meetings with groups, interviews and conversations.  This information will be shared with other campuses in the distributed system of the university to provide examples of successful community service opportunities that result in effective developmental relationships.

    Keywords: faculty community service, outreach, effective developmental relationships, sustainability of the university, local community

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  • Professional mentorship and the recruitment of MLIS students
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    Students choose graduate programs for a variety of reasons, many students have a mentor to help guide or focus interest in a program or specialization. This is particularly important for masters programs in library and information science, an interdisciplinary degree that combines theoretical and practical components to educate information professionals for work in a technologically oriented and knowledge-based society. Surveys of MLIS students at the University of Alabama and Simmons College were administered in 2013, with 343 responses. More than 50% of respondents had a mentor, however, more than 70% of students worked in an LIS environment prior to entering a program, which implies that either staff are not mentoring student workers or that the students do perceive their interactions with fellow staff as mentoring. Hence, it begs the question: Who are LIS student mentors? Are they colleagues, supervisors or library leaders? Do they hold traditional LIS position titles? Does the type of library environment make a different in perceived mentorship? How does this mentoring relationship influence students’ career choices and expectations? This paper examines the job titles of the mentors identified by students, the environments in which the students have worked and their identification with LIS. Identifying current mentors may help to identify how this relationship impacts the recruitment of MLIS students.

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  • Mentoring Interdisciplinary and Honors Undergraduates at Smaller Universities
    Posted in Conference Proceedings on February 18, 2015

    The mentoring of undergraduates who are majoring in interdisciplinary and honors programs at smaller universities presents unique challenges. These students write senior research theses and are better prepared than most graduates for diverse careers and postgraduate education in a fast-changing world, but they have to present themselves without easily pigeonholed qualifications. This roundtable will discuss best mentoring practices from the perspectives of honors and interdisciplinary faculty and successful interdisciplinary graduates who are now professionals and/or interdisciplinary faculty themselves. Special attention will be given to the mentoring of interdisciplinary undergraduate research in increasingly online teaching environments.

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